No Fault States

The term No Fault States is used to categorise states which apply no fault auto insurance laws. Currently there are 12 such states – Florida, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Dakota and Utah. If you live in one of these No Fault States, you should familiar yourself with the particular laws and requirements applicable to you.

In some states a qualitative verbal threshold is used, while in others a quantitative monetary threshold. A slightly different version of no fault insurance called Choice no fault is used in 3 states – Kentucky, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. It is worth mentioning that non of the No Fault States uses a pure no fault system, but rather a modified version.

Under a pure no fault system, your insurance company will cover any so-called economic damages like medical bills and loss of earnings, up to the specified limits of the policy of course, but you won’t be able to file a lawsuit against the at fault party. Under the modified version of the no fault law, you will be able to sue for non-economic damages like pain and suffering, if specific threshold is met.

Here are some basic details regarding the minimum level of cover required in each state and links to the official departments’ websites.

Florida No Fault

Michigan No Fault

New Jersey No Fault

New York No Fault

Pennsylvania No Fault

Hawaii No Fault

Kansas No Fault

  • $25,000 per person
  • $50,000 per accident
  • $10,000 PDL
  • Quantitative monetary threshold – $1,000
  • Uninsured motorist coverage is required
  • Kansas Insurance Department

Kentucky No Fault

Massachusetts No Fault

Minnesota No Fault

North Dakota No Fault

  • $25,000 per person
  • $50,000 per accident
  • $25,000 PDL
  • Quantitative monetary threshold – $2,500
  • Uninsured motorist coverage is required
  • North Dakota Insurance Department

Utah No Fault